Specialty Coffee

Vertically Integrated Through Full Production

Our Coffee

Geisha

Geisha is a tall tree and the new leaves or buds can be green and/or bronze. This is a low yield tree, but high quality. Currently, considered one of the best quality in the coffee world. This tree is tolerant to coffee leaf rust but susceptible nematodes and coffee berry disease.

Panamanian Geisha is an exotic coffee with unique jazmine aroma, peach flavor and resonant refreshing acidity. This is one of the most expensive coffee sold right now in the Specialty Coffee market.

Currently, we have planted 29.600 plants and in the nursery 3213 seedlings.

Bourbon

This is considered for many as a varietal its own.

Phenotypically, this is recognized as a tall tree, with broad leaves and relatively small fruits. The tree shows a slight conical shape. Compare to Typica, it has more abundant branches with a narrower angle. The new leaves are green. This tree has wider leaf than typical with wavier edges. Because of its tall size, it is more susceptible to strong winds, being necessary to planted in proper areas.

This varietal is being recognized by its bright acidity, with a winey and sweet aftertaste.

Currently, less than 1% of our producing trees are bourbon, but we have 5000 seedlings in our nursery to be planted in the next months.

Catuai

is a hybrid plant resulting of the artificial crossing of the Mundo Novo and Caturra varieties, made in Brazil.

Phenotypically, it is a dwarf compact plant. The lateral branches form a closed angle with the main stem, and it has short internodes. The new leaves or buds are green, the adult leaves have a rounded shape and are bright. Due to its structure, catuai are plants very resistant to the wind effect and strong rains.

In terms of quality, catuai is very versatile coffee, that mainly depend on where it was planted and the soil conditions. However, it main characteristic it sweetness flavor.

Typica

This is considered for many as the main Arabica coffee varietal.

Typica is a tall tree with a conical shape with branches that creates a 50 – 70 degree angle towards the vertical stem. The first leaf is bronze color, and has long internodes. This plant has a low yield potential, very high susceptibility to coffee leaf rust but high quality bean.

All the efforts to invest in planting Typical are rewarded by an excellent cup profile. Depending on the altitude you can find typical coffees with intense acidity with floral notes and very sweet aftertastes.

Currently, we have less than 1% of typical coffee in production, but already 43.538 young plants planted and 23.137 seedlings in the nursery.

Caturra

it is a natural mutation of the Bourbon variety.

Phenotypically, it is a dwarf tree with a thick stem. Not many main branches with abundant secondary branches and short internodes. The leaves are large and broad. The new leaves or buds are green.

In term of quality, it is recognized by it well-pronounces acidity related to a citric or lemony flavor notes. As many other varietals, this coffee and change and improve its notes by managing a good fertilization program.

Currently, the majority of our Caturra is in the young stage, expecting to be producing in three years.

Pacamara

This is a variety is a cross between Maragogype and Pacas done in El Salvador.  This is a plant of small size, short internodes and high productivity, with fruits and large leaves of the Maragogype type.

The Pacamara is a medium-sized tree with thick foliage. It has short internodes, and large leaves.  The cherries are big and the seeds are large and oval in shape.

Traceability

Process 1

Specialty coffee should not be confused with “gourmet” or “premium” coffee.These are simply marketing terms with no defined standards.

According to the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA), “coffee which scores 80 points or above on a 100-point scale is graded “specialty”

Specialty coffees are grown in special and ideal climates, and are distinctive because of their full cup taste with little to no defects. The unique flavors and tastes are a result of the special characteristics and composition of the soils in which they are produced”.

The Specialty Coffee Association of America, established in 1982, and with members in over 40 countries worldwide, has set very strict industry standards when it comes to scoring Specialty Coffee.

These standards are set by a Standards Committee and to borrow a quote from their website…

“It is a quantifiable and qualifiable measure, based upon scientific testing, which set values and/or ranges of values for coffee”

Process 2

For a more in-depth look please click on the link below and visit the SCAA website, just CLICK HERE.

Cupping coffee is the process of evaluating and scoring brewed coffee. “It is a quantifiable and qualifiable measure, based upon scientific testing, which set values and/or ranges of values for coffee”

This is where Q-Graders (Quality Graders), or master tasters, certified by The Coffee Quality Institute (CQI) blind test the coffee and award scores based on fragrance, aroma, flavor, acidity, after taste, body, balance, sweetness, cleanliness and uniformity.

Each section is analyzed and broken down in detail, awarded points from 1 to 10 and independently scored by dozens of Q Graders.

Aroma alone can be described as animal like, ashy, burnt, chocolate, earthy, floral, nutty, woody and even spicy.

There are currently over 3,500 certified Q-graders worldwide, and growing! The Q Coffee System identifies quality coffees and brings them to market through a credible and verifiable system.

Specialty coffee should not be confused with “gourmet” or “premium” coffee.These are simply marketing terms with no defined standards.

According to the Specialty Coffee Association of America (SCAA), “coffee which scores 80 points or above on a 100-point scale is graded “specialty”

Specialty coffees are grown in special and ideal climates, and are distinctive because of their full cup taste with little to no defects. The unique flavors and tastes are a result of the special characteristics and composition of the soils in which they are produced”.

The Specialty Coffee Association of America, established in 1982, and with members in over 40 countries worldwide, has set very strict industry standards when it comes to scoring Specialty Coffee.

These standards are set by a Standards Committee and to borrow a quote from their website…

“It is a quantifiable and qualifiable measure, based upon scientific testing, which set values and/or ranges of values for coffee”

For a more in-depth look please click on the link below and visit the SCAA website, just CLICK HERE.

Cupping coffee is the process of evaluating and scoring brewed coffee. “It is a quantifiable and qualifiable measure, based upon scientific testing, which set values and/or ranges of values for coffee”

This is where Q-Graders (Quality Graders), or master tasters, certified by The Coffee Quality Institute (CQI) blind test the coffee and award scores based on fragrance, aroma, flavor, acidity, after taste, body, balance, sweetness, cleanliness and uniformity.

Each section is analyzed and broken down in detail, awarded points from 1 to 10 and independently scored by dozens of Q Graders.

Aroma alone can be described as animal like, ashy, burnt, chocolate, earthy, floral, nutty, woody and even spicy.

There are currently over 3,500 certified Q-graders worldwide, and growing! The Q Coffee System identifies quality coffees and brings them to market through a credible and verifiable system.

This system allows Specialty Coffee farmers (like ICFC) to have their coffee tested against industry standards to ensure that they get top dollar for the coffee and are rewarded for years of hard work, with the focus on coffee Quality, not just Quantity.

This is our focus here at International Coffee Farms.

The retail value of the U.S coffee market is estimated at $46 billion dollars a year, with Specialty Coffee comprising approximately 51% volume share but nearly 55% value share. Up from only 1% almost 25 years ago and surpassing non-specialty for the first time ever.

Up from only 1% almost 25 years ago and surpassing non-specialty for the first time ever.

According to the International Coffee Organization (ICO) demand for coffee is set to increase by 25% over the next 5 years.

“Consumption is increasing as societies in India, China and Latin America continue to be Westernized,” the ICO’s executive director Roberio Silva told theWall Street Journal.

To promote and self-regulate this growing industry, growers, exporters, roasters, retailers and equipment suppliers have established trade associations. These associations exist in both coffee-consuming and coffee-producing countries.

Among the countries that are famous for producing excellent specialty coffee are Ethiopia, Kenya, and here in Panama.